Photo Tips

Do your digtial images really exist? If you really think about it, unlike the old days of film when you could tuck away your photos and negatives safely in a file cabinet, today's digital files could suddenly disapear as the result of a sudden power surge, black out or hard drive crash. In that sense, they really don't exist in a physical form like your old negatives and slides, rather only as phantom 1's and 0's stored on a delicate hard drive or memory card. 

Today's laptops and computers include at least one built-in USB 3.0 port. In comparison to its USB 2.0 predecessor, USB 3.0 offers some great advantages - particularly for photographers.

"What are some notable differences between USB 2.0 & 3.0?" Well, let's look at some facts....

We get asked all the time where to find training and tutorials on Photoshop. Many good sources are available, but  we have found Lynda.com is among the best. They offer tutorials and classes on just about every software you can think of as part of their subscription package. Lynda.com has a free trial membership so you can explore what they have available, and once you see all they offer, you'll probably want to sign up for a subscription plan.

The resolution of your digital file needs be large enough to support the print size that you want. The chart below will allow you to determine the pixel resolution required for various print sizes. Many people think of resolution as dpi, which ironically is not very accurate; a file can be 1000 dpi and only be capable of providing only modest sized print, while on the otherhand, a 72 dpi file might make a good wall size mural. The only "true" measure of resolution is the "pixel resolution", which is expressed in pixels as length by width.

Have you noticed that your printed photos sometimes don't match the image you see on your computer screen? There can be plenty of reasons why, but most are due to one or more incorrect areas of your Color Management workflow. Often, these issues might turn out to be a lack of proper monitor calibration, including Whitepoint, Gamma and/or an incorrect setting of the Colorspace the files are view and corrected within. Here are some quick tips to check on your settings.

We strongly suggest you just start reviewing the instruction from the beginning, and read all of them. There are many features that need explaining, but did not fall into a category in the table.

Rendering Intents

Several rendering intents are availble when saving a file within a given color space. Each offers specific advantages depending on the output device and end use of the printed piece. This review is intended to clarify the differences between each rendering intent and offer suggestions to customize the optimize the output of your product.


Perceptual
This intent is best for photographic images and as such is the the popular rendering intent. The relationship between colors in the original is scaled proportionally to fit the output device's color gamut. This is the preferred intent when printing on our Noritsu or Epson printer of conventional photographic images or fine art reproduction.
Relative Colorimetric
This intent is best for images, such as logos, where the original needs to exactly match the output. Colors that fall outside of the output device's gamut are converted to colors at the edge of the gamut. Colors that fall inside the output device's gamut are shifted so that they do not exactly match colors that were originally outside the gamut. This may reduce the total number of colors available. For this reason, this intent should only be used when there are relatively few colors in an image. This rendering intent may be appropriate for certain types of fine art reproduction.
Absolute Colorimetric
This intent is best for images that are inside the output device's gamut. Colors that fall outside of the output device's gamut are converted to colors at the edge of the gamut. Colors that fall inside the output device's gamut are not shifted so that may print the same color as colors that were originally outside the gamut. For this reason, this intent should only be used when there are relatively few colors in an image.
Saturation
This intent is best for images where true color matching is not as important as vivid colors. Colors outside of the output device's gamut are converted to colors within the same saturation but with a different lightness. This intent may be used to boost colors within a photographic image when bold color impact is desired and an exact color match is not necessary.
Spot
This intent is best for use with Pantone colors, devices with spot colors and vector images. This intent, which produces the greatest saturation possible, should only be used with non-photographic images.

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